7 Common Foods That Can Impact Your Dental Health

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Selection of food high in sugar, copy space

The saying that goes ‘you are what you eat’ also applies to our dental health. This is because a lot of the foods that we usually eat every day can cause plaque, which can severely damage our teeth if you allow it to run rampant in your mouth. 

Plaque is a thin, sticky film that’s full of bacteria and other germs. Every time you eat a snack or a meal that contains a lot of sugar, these particles can cause the bacteria to produce acid that attacks our teeth. These can break down the hard enamel found on the surface of our teeth, leading to tooth decay. 

As with everything in life, prevention is always better than cure. You don’t want the condition of your teeth to deteriorate while you’re still at your prime. Moreover, dental expenditure can take its toll on your wallet since, often, people wait at the last minute to visit their dentist. They then end up with a bigger problem than if they had gone to the doctor at the first sign of dental trouble.

With this, you should avoid foods that can increase the risk of tooth decay. Here are some examples:

  1. Candies

It’s not surprising to see candies on the top of our list here. Candies, especially the sour ones, contain plenty of acids that are tougher on our teeth. Aside from that, these candies are more likely to cause tooth decay because they’re chewy and tends to stick on our teeth for a longer time. 

If you’re craving sweets, opt for chocolates instead of candies. This is because chocolates are easy to chew and wash away. Dark variants also provide other health benefits, such as being a source of antioxidants and improving blood flow.

  1. Bread

Bread also has a negative impact on our dental health, which is why you better think twice when you’re buying them at the supermarket. It’s not that bread is bad for your diet. In fact, they’re a good source of carbohydrates, which is needed by our body for energy. However, consuming too much bread can cause damage to our teeth.

When we chew bread, saliva breaks down the starches into sugar. In this process, it turns into a gummy paste-like substance that tends to stick between the small crevices in your mouth. When that sticks, it can cause cavities. To maintain healthy teeth and gums, make sure to brush your teeth properly.

Woman eating salad, feeling tooth ache from excess acid in products, health
  1. Carbonated Soft Drinks

Carbonated soft drinks are the leading source of added sugar in teens and adults. It’s no secret that carbonated drinks have a considerable impact on the body even if it marketed as a ‘diet’ variant. 

A recent study shows that drinking carbonated soft drinks several times a day has the same damage as using harmful chemicals, like methamphetamine and cocaine, to the teeth. Hence, drinking carbonated soft drinks a couple of times a day definitely won’t give you that million-watt smile. If anything, it will only serve to destroy your teeth.

Furthermore, carbonated soft drinks contain ingredients that promote the formation of plaque, which can corrode the hard enamel on your teeth. You’re essentially dousing them with acid if you drink large quantities of soda all day. Aside from that, carbonated sodas also cause dry mouth and may lead to the discoloration of your teeth. 

  1. Alcohol

You already know the effects of consuming too much alcohol on your body, but did you know what alcohol does to your teeth every time you drink it? 

First, alcohol can cause dry mouth, which means less saliva. Bear in mind that saliva is very important as it keeps our teeth healthy. Also, saliva is responsible for washing away food particles and residues, and it also prevents food from sticking to our teeth. Saliva also helps repair the early signs of dental problems, such as tooth decay, gum disease, and oral infections. 

When you consume alcohol regularly, but don’t drink water to replenish the moisture levels in your mouth, you increase the risk of damaging your teeth. Keep your mouth hydrated all the time by drinking plenty of water or use oral hydration solutions. 

  1. Potato Chips

If you’re one of those people who love to eat potato chips and have been doing so since your childhood, you better stop it now. As good and satisfying potato chips are, they’re loaded with starch, which converts into sugar once chewed. It’ll then get trapped between the crevices in our teeth and feed the bacteria that turns to plaque, which can lead to tooth decay. 

To remove the trapped particles, it’s recommended to floss your teeth after a bag of potato chips. Supplement this by brushing your teeth or, at the very least, gargling with mouthwash.

  1. Dried Fruits

Dried fruits are considered a healthy snack for the body but the same can’t be said for your teeth, though. Many of your favorite dried fruits, such as raisins, apricots, figs, and prunes, among others, are very sticky. They can get easily trapped between the gaps once chewed, which leaves a lot of sugar behind. 

If you’re craving dried fruits, be sure to rinse your mouth with water thoroughly after eating. Then, brush and floss your teeth. 

  1. Citrus Fruits

Citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, grapefruits, tangerine, etc. are indeed tasty, delicious, and are also rich in vitamin C, but their acid content, however, has a negative impact on your dental health. The acid content found in these types of fruits can cause the tooth enamel to erode, making our teeth more vulnerable to tooth decay. 

To prevent possible dental problems, eat or drink citrus fruits in moderation and make sure to rinse your mouth afterward.

Summing It All Up

This is the list of foods that can have a negative impact on our dental health. If you’re craving one of these foods, make sure to keep it in moderation and be sure to rinse your mouth with water after every time. Also, educate yourself on the foods and drinks that are good for your teeth.

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